Muhammad Ismail Says He Is Proud of Triple Honor Killing


 

04/Apr/2013

Source: CNN

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Kot Chutta, Pakistan (CNN) — From behind the steel bars of his jail cell, Muhammad Ismail described with uncanny ease how he shot and killed his wife, his mother-in-law, and sister-in-law.
“The first shot hit the side of her body,” Ismail said. “I left her there and went next door and killed my wife’s mother and sister. I made sure they were all dead. Then I locked the door and left the house.”

Without any apparent regret, Ismail said he would do it again.

“I am proud of what I did. That’s why I turned myself over to the police.”

Ismail’s confession to the triple-murder that took place last February in a village in central Pakistan is a rare and chilling first-hand account of a so-called ‘honor’ killing — the murder of women who are usually accused of dishonoring their families by being unfaithful or disobedient.

Ismail accused his wife of eight months of repeatedly flirting with other men and spending long hours away from home.

“My wife never made me happy,” said the 20-year-old who played drums in a traditional Pakistani wedding band before his arrest. “She was like a prostitute. She never took care of me.”

The Human Rights Commission of Pakistan reported 943 women were “killed in the name of honor” in Pakistan last year, an increase of more than 100 from 2010.

Rights groups blame the increase in ‘honor’ murders partly on what they call an ineffective justice system in Pakistan that too often allows killers to go unpunished.

Despite his videotaped confession to CNN and an earlier confession to police, prosecutors say Ismail can soon be a free man if his victims’ family agrees to accept compensation for the killings.

Receiving blood money is an option for victims in many conservative Muslim societies under the Islamic principal that mercy is more noble than revenge.